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Key Real Estate Terms and Formulas for Investors


Keys

Investing in rental real estate can be a profitable venture, but navigating the world of property management and financial calculations can feel overwhelming. Fear not! In this fun blog, we'll dive into essential rental real estate terms and formulas that every investor should know. So grab your calculator and let's get started on this exciting journey!


1. Cash Flow


Ah yes... the lifeblood of rental real estate, cash flow refers to the amount of money left after deducting all expenses (mortgage, taxes, insurance, maintenance) from rental income. Positive cash flow means your property is generating more income than expenses, while negative cash flow indicates the opposite.


To calculate cash flow: subtract all expenses (mortgage, taxes, insurance, maintenance) from rental income. Cash Flow = Rental Income – Expenses


Generally, a cash flow of $200 to $500 per month is considered desirable, depending on the property size, location, and financing terms.



Cash is preferred

2. Cap Rate


A vital metric for evaluating the profitability of an investment property, the Capitalization Rate is calculated by dividing the Net Operating Income (NOI) by the property's purchase price (don't know what NOI is?... keep reading). It helps determine the return on investment and compares the property's income potential to its value.


Cap Rate is calculated by: dividing the Net Operating Income (NOI) by the property's purchase price. Cap Rate = NOI / Purchase Price


A cap rate of 5% to 10% is typically considered average, but this can vary based on market conditions, property type, and location. Higher cap rates (10%+) may indicate properties with higher risks but potentially higher returns.

 

"...remember the one thing you must continually ask yourself aside from the numbers is... do you even want the property?"

 

3. NOI


Net Operating Income is the total income generated by a rental property after subtracting operating expenses (excluding mortgage payments). It includes rental income, fees, and additional revenue sources. NOI is a crucial figure in determining a property's profitability.


NOI is calculated by: subtracting operating expenses (excluding mortgage payments) from rental income. NOI = Rental Income - Operating Expenses


While it depends on various factors, such as property type and location, an average NOI range is around 40% to 60% of the gross rental income. However, this can vary significantly based on local market conditions.


Apartment Building

4. Gross Rent Multiplier


That's gross... nope... the GRM, Gross Rent Multiplier helps to quickly estimate the value of a rental property. It is calculated by dividing the property's purchase price by its annual gross rental income. The lower the GRM, the better the investment potential.


The GRM is calculated by: dividing the property's purchase price by its annual gross rental income. GRM = Purchase Price / Annual Gross Rental Income


Typically, a GRM of 8 to 12 is considered average. However, it's important to note that GRM varies across different markets, property types, and conditions. Use it as a starting point, but perform a thorough analysis for accurate property valuation.


5. Vacancy Rate


The vacancy rate represents the percentage of time a rental property remains unoccupied. It is crucial to consider when estimating potential income. Lower vacancy rates indicate high demand and potentially higher rental income.


To calculate vacancy rate, divide the number of vacant rental units by the total number of units. Vacancy Rate = (Number of Vacant Units / Total Units) x 100


Generally, a vacancy rate of 5% to 8% is considered average, although this can differ between urban, suburban areas and property types.

 
 

6. ROI


Return On Investment measures the profitability of an investment. In rental real estate, ROI calculates the percentage return on the initial investment, taking into account cash flow, appreciation, tax benefits, and equity accumulation.


ROI is calculated by: dividing the total return on investment by the initial investment amount and expressing it as a percentage. ROI = (Total Return on Investment / Initial Investment) x 100


Fun fact... your ROI from reading this blog is infinite however, a good range for rental real estate ROI is 8% to 12%. However, the ROI can vary based on factors such as property appreciation, financing terms, and rental market conditions.


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7. Loan to Value


LTV ratio expresses the relationship between the property's loan amount and its appraised value. It helps lenders assess risk and determine loan terms. A lower LTV ratio signifies less risk for the lender.


LTV ratio is calculated by: dividing the loan amount by the appraised value of the property. LTV Ratio = (Loan Amount / Appraised Value) x 100


Loan to value ratios vary depending on lenders' requirements and risk tolerance. Typically, a lower LTV ratio, around 70% to 80%, is considered average. However, some lenders may allow higher ratios, especially for experienced investors.


8. Cash on Cash Return


This metric measures the annual cash flow generated by an investment property relative to the initial cash investment. It is calculated by dividing the annual cash flow by the total cash investment.


To calculate cash-on-cash return: divide the annual cash flow by the total cash investment and express it as a percentage. Cash-on-Cash Return = (Annual Cash Flow / Total Cash Investment) x 100


An average cash-on-cash return in the range of 6% to 10% is considered desirable. However, this can vary depending on factors such as property type, location, and financing terms.


Appreciation sign

9. Appreciation


We appreciate you so much that we insert silly photos just to prove it but... appreciation refers to the increase in a property's value over time. Real estate generally appreciates, although the rate can vary depending on market conditions. Appreciation can significantly impact an investor's overall return.


Appreciation is calculated by: multiplying the property's value by the appreciation rate. Appreciation = Property Value x Appreciation Rate


Historically, real estate appreciates around 3% to 5% annually on average. However, it's important to note that appreciation rates can be higher or lower depending on the specific market and property dynamics


10. Debt Service Coverage Ratio


DSCR determines a property's ability to cover its debt obligations. It is calculated by dividing the Net Operating Income by the annual debt payments. Lenders often use DSCR to assess the risk associated with financing a rental property.


DSCR is calculated by: dividing the Net Operating Income by the annual debt payments. DSCR = NOI / Annual Debt Payments


Lenders typically require a minimum DSCR of 1.2 to 1.4 to approve financing for rental properties. A higher DSCR provides a stronger cushion to cover debt obligations and indicates a more financially viable property.


Using Real Estate Terms and Formulas to Invest


Congratulations! You've mastered some essential rental real estate terms and calculations but remember... the one thing you must continually ask yourself aside from the numbers... do you even want the property? This question is important because long after the dust settles you will be the one which will have to manage it within your portfolio.


These tools will help you navigate the exciting world of property investment with confidence. Remember, understanding these concepts is crucial for evaluating potential investments, assessing profitability, and making informed decisions. So go out there, crunch the numbers, and embark on your journey to real estate success! Happy investing!




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About Ricardo Reis

Ricardo is a member of G3 Management & Investments and a real estate professional. He has been a successful property manager and real estate investor for over 10 years.


 

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